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Importance of No-Pull Dog Harnesses and No-Pull Dog Collars

It’s very common for dogs to pull on their leashes when owners walking them. Dog leash pulling is one of the main issues first-time owners run into that prompt them to start training their dogs for their own safety, and for the safety of dogs. Some tools can be of help in this matter, and one of them are no-pull dog harnesses, which we’ll discuss later in the article.

Dog owners must understand that leash pulling is not just a nuisance. This type of behavior can potentially cause danger to dogs and those walking them, as one study shows. To be more specific, further research also suggests that dog leash pulling may result in too high blood pressure flowing into the dogs’ eyes, and potentially broken trachea or larynx.

How to stop dog leash pullingDog trainers also warn owners that puppies that are not properly leash trained will turn into adult dogs that pull incessantly on their dog leashes thereby continuing this misbehavior.

This can be a major issue particularly with strong larger breeds such as Staffordshire Bull Terriers. These dogs can weigh upwards of 60 pounds which means serious problems when the dog decides to really take off.

Although many owners see leash pulling as “something dogs do,” it is in fact a behavioral problem that must be corrected as soon as possible. Some owners opt for negative punishment (ineffective), positive punishment (also ineffective), shouting at the dog and other similar ineffective methods¹.

Research demonstrates² that tools such as no pull dog harnesses which serve as disruptive stimuli work better with dogs who like to pull a lot. Compared to negative/positive punishment, using a no pull dog harness simply serves as an “undesirable event” for the dog, which eventually leads the animal to change its course of action towards a more desirable behavior³.

RELATED: What is the Best Dog Harness?

How No-Pull Dog Harnesses and Collars Help with Dog Leash Pulling

Why No-Pull Dog Harnesses and Head Collars Are The Only Solution

Dogs that pull incessantly cannot wear regular dog collars. These collars simply do not work for training or even walking (if they pull incessantly), and may result in injuries for both the dog and the owner, as I noted above.

Not only do regular dog collars cause pain and injuries, but they are also very easy for the pet to slip out of, as well as allowing the dog to easily drag the owner all over the place. And although dogs do in fact feel pain, they do not always comprehend the fact that they are hurting themselves or place the owner in danger.

I’ve seen dog owners try different methods. Aside from negative punishment, some choose to use choke collars or pronged collars for dogs that pull on the leash. That is far from an ideal solution, which also rarely results in what the owners try to achieve, according to studies.

Dog trainers and other animal experts agree that using either one of these collars may hurt the dog, both physically and mentally. So pair that with the evidence of them being ineffective, and that’s a good enough reason to dismiss prong collars and choke collars altogether.

With the above in mind, it appears that no pull dog products such as special harnesses or collars are indeed the best solution we currently have today. No pull dog harnesses, for example, are becoming the most popular solution for pulling dogs which should be used in addition to proper training.

Even though a no pull dog harness is the safest and easiest way to stop a dog from pulling on a leash – and definitely better than prong, choke or shock collars – remember that leash pulling training cannot be avoided.

These harnesses only serve as a temporary solution while training the dog to stop pulling.

With that being said, as you’re attempting to start training your dog to not pull on the leash (see the video below on how to do it), you’ll have to get either one of the two tools: dog head collar or dog front clip harness, which is essentially a so-called “no pull dog harness.” 

These tools have been shown to work well for training dogs to stop pulling on the leash without harming them. Many dog experts and trainers continue to use them. However, keep in mind that it’s very important to get the right stuff.

FULL GUIDE: How To Stop A Dog From Pulling – Step-By-Step Instructions

No-Pull Dog Head Collars

PetSafe Petite Gentle Leader Head CollarHead dog collars are one of the best ways to teach your dog to mind you when they are on a leash. Do not mistake these collars for muzzles.

Although they do go around the dog’s snout – sort of like an open muzzle – dogs are still able to open their mouths, pick things up, drink, and eat when the head collar is on.

In the photo to the right, you can see what a dog head collar looks like. You can find more of them here and browse through their description for details. They’re also not very expensive, so most owners can buy them as a temporary solution and stop using when the time is right.

These collars for dogs may not look “good” on your pooch, but if you’re having problems with your pet pulling on the leash, this cannot be avoided. Plus, it’s only temporary, so when you get a stare from another dog owner in the park, pretend you’re about to unleash your fierce beast on them that is your Yorkie. Not really.

Dog head collars allow the dog walker to attach the dog leash to the strap around the canine’s muzzle and lead them in the direction they want the dog to go instead of pulling on the dog’s neck like a basic collar would. This removes all the unnecessary strain, even though it may not look as attractive as a harness.

Multiple dog trainers agree that dog head collars work very well for “determined pullers.” They’re also safe for dogs, as long as you use them the right way.

When your dog pulls on the leash, the strap around the muzzle will put pressure on a point that triggers your pooch to relax immediately. Because pressure is only applied when the dog pulls, your pet will begin to realize that he is the one in control of the pressure.

A word of caution. Although dog head collars are excellent for dogs that pull, they also take some time for the dog to get used to, and therefore do require a little bit of leash training using the proper dog leash that fits them. You must prepare and train for this before you and your pooch are able to a dog head collar on a daily basis.

FULL GUIDE: How To Train A Dog To Walk On A Leash

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Front Clip/No-Pull Dog Harnesses

Ruffwear Front Range Harness, Medium, Alpenglow PinkMore and more dog owners are switching to using dog harnesses over regular collars and simple dog leashes, even when there are no issues with pulling. This makes sense for multiple reasons.

Not only does using a really good dog harnesses with a front clip prevent any injuries from your dog pulling, it’s also generally safer in many other potential scenarios. It even looks better and more humane on a dog, or so I have been complemented.

What you see to the right is that type of a dog harness, made by Ruffwear – a company with great reputation. I personally love their products, and their dog harness is by far the best quality you can get. However, it is one of the more expensive ones you can get. If you need more details and see the price, check here.

Many dog companies are now focused on manufacturing different types of front clip/no-pull dog harnesses and other similar devices that help owners to deal with leash pulling, which is a very common issue.

If you’re wondering what other solutions may there be, here are some news articles from the most recent releases of no-pull dog products:

As most of you know, there are several types of dog harnesses out there, and not all of them work in the same way or help the same cause. Not all of them also work for the same types of dogs. A lot depends on your pet’s breed, size, age and temperament.

When discussing dog harnesses, many imagine those step-in harnesses for dogs which allow the walker to clip the leash between the dog’s shoulder blades. While these may be good for walking dogs in general, if you have an issue with your dog pulling on the leash, then these harnesses are not for you. In fact, these dog harnesses encourage pulling.

So my advice is to stick with one of the two options we discussed above.

FULL GUIDE: How To Put On A Dog Harness 101 – Step-By-Step Process

Take Home Message

Why you must use a front clip no pull dog harnessTo summarize, dog head collars (they work) or front clip harnesses for dogs (these work better) are the only two options that do well for dogs that pull on the leash.

Front clip no pull dog harness will allow you to clip the dog leash directly to it in the middle of the dog’s chest, thereby providing perfect balance when there’s stimuli.

Also, this way there are two straps applying pressure to the dog’s chest at the time of pulling, and it’s also easier for the owner to train the dog to stop pulling permanently using a no pull dog harness.

To put the final nail into the coffin, front clip dog harnesses are more easily accepted by the dog, by the pet loving community and there’s a lot less training required to start using them effectively. Finally, they just look so damn good!

So if you’re thinking whether to go with a dog head collar or a front clip harness, then go with the latter. 

Most importantly, please do not use any other tools that may hurt your dog or you as well as prevent you from effectively training your pet to stop pulling once and for all. These trial and error methods have already been done by other dog owners – they don’t work (please see studies above).

If you want some advice on training dogs using front-clip dog harnesses, I recommend you reading some of these articles (I also linked to these above in the article):

References:

  1. Blackwell E.J., Twells C., Seawright A., Casey R.A. The relationship between training methods and the occurrence of behavior problems as reported by owners, in a population of domestic dogs. J. Vet. Behav. 2008;3:207–217. doi: 10.1016/j.jveb.2007.10.008
  2. Shivik J.A., Martin D.J. Aversive and disruptive stimulus applications for managing predation; Proceedings of the Wildlife Damage Management Conferences; State College, PA, USA. 5 October 2000; p. 20
  3. Pageat P., Tessier Y. Disruptive stimulus: Definition and application in behavior therapy; Proceedings of the First International Conference of Veterinary Behavioral Medicine; Birmingham, UK. 1 April 1997; p. 187