SHARE
Cute Rescue Dog's Breed Remains A Mystery Because She Has No Hair
Photo: Instagram/watch.me.blossom
A woman with a soft spot for rescue dogs has taken Blossom into her home despite not knowing anything about the dog's past.

A Los Angeles shelter received little Blossom last April but no one could tell what kind of breed she is because she's completely bald.

Unfortunately, workers at the shelter cannot afford to conduct any tests on Blossom for lack of funds. Without the tests, Blossom also cannot get any treatments for what's ailing her and it was clear from how she looks that she has plenty of health issues.

A woman with a soft spot for rescue dogs has taken Blossom into her home
Photo: Instagram/watch.me.blossom

So, the shelter put Blossom's profile up for adoption on the website without treating her and knowing it was a long shot someone would take notice. Sitting untested and untreated in the shelter for days, Blossom waited for a kind-hearted person who could take her in.

The State Of Dogs In Shelters

The shelter's decision for Blossom is not unusual and it's the ugly truth about rescue dogs, where there are at least three million in the U.S. alone.

The State Of Dogs In Shelters
Photo: Instagram/watch.me.blossom

Unfortunately, that high number means shelters everywhere could be overpopulated and not every center has enough funds to feed and treat the animals. Thus, many shelters operate with limited options and make the choices they think would benefit the majority, including euthanizing dogs or isolating those with health problems or aggression issues.

While it's heartbreaking for Blossom not to get the proper treatment, the shelter workers perhaps did as much as they can for her, given the limited resources.  The dog’s case, however, is raising a good point about the huge responsibilities of pet owners.

The odd and unknown cute dog called Blossom
Photo: Instagram/watch.me.blossom

Aside from committing to their long-term care, people with pets need to consider spaying or neutering their pets, as well as installing microchips in case they go missing.

An Angel From San Diego

Animal lover Gretchen May from San Diego spotted Blossom on the shelter's website and while she had her eye on adopting a different dog, something was telling her that Blossom would be the right one for her family.

Gretchen reportedly mentioned that Blossom just looked so pitiful and she could tell that she itched all over her body. Despite how she looked, Gretchen could also tell that Blossom was a sweet dog.

An Angel From San Diego
Photo: Instagram/watch.me.blossom

So, she tapped the help of Precious Pals Pet Rescue to take the dog in for her for the meantime, since she lives in another city. The group quickly took action and brought Blossom to the vet.

It was determined that she suffered from skin wounds, ear infections, upper respiratory infection and kennel cough. Blossom might also have allergies but the vet is hoping this will clear soon.

Her Breed Is Still A Mystery

A month after living with May, however, they still could not tell her breed because her hair has not grown. Her skin is still too soft and tender that hair growth could take some time.

Gretchen, however, thinks Blossom is either Chihuahua or a Maltese. One day, she might just learn more know more about Blossom’s past. What she's certain of, for now at least, is that the dog is sweet and calm, enjoys humans' laps and loves the attention.

Will Gene Mapping Help?

Can gene mapping help Gretchen learn of Blossom's breed? The technology is already available but unfortunately, most genetic tests aren't comprehensive enough. Compared to human gene mapping, the process is still in its infancy stages for dogs, according to a study published in the Nature Reviews Genetics.

Her Breed Is Still A Mystery
Photo: Instagram/watch.me.blossom

There are also mobile apps that supposedly tell the dog's genetic makeup and while it's not accurate, it's a lot of fun for dog lovers. Not all apps, however, can identify all types of dog breed and there are hundreds them.

READ NEXT: Hikers Rescue Starving Dog Lost for 6 Weeks on a Mountain