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Are you trying to adopt a deaf dog? In this article, we'll discuss the best deaf dog groups, organizations, or deaf dog rescues that promote and dedicate their time to deaf dogs.

Have you ever wondered how would you take care of a deaf dog? You're probably thinking that it'll require a lot of work and it'll be harder than usual.

Well, the truth is, it is not easy taking care of a deaf dog (or any other dog in particular).

Dogs require training, socialization, a proper diet, and more. However, caring for a deaf dog is just as much work as caring for a hearing one, it's just a bit different.

Below, we'll also discuss the pros and cons of owning a deaf dog, the causes of hearing loss in dogs, and many more!

But first, let's dive into these deaf dog groups!

deaf dog pros and cons vet

Deaf Dog Groups

If you're looking to adopt a deaf dog or you just found out that your dog is deaf, scroll down below because these groups or rescues can help you out.

They promote the care and well-being of deaf dogs.

Without further ado, here are the best deaf dog groups that you should look into:

deaf dogs rock with background

Deaf Dogs Rock

Deaf Dogs Rock started with Christina Lee, the founder of DeafDogsRock.com, and an abandoned white deaf boxer puppy named Nitro.

This adorable little pup became the inspiration when in 2010, a City of Salem Animal Control Officer, found an abandoned pup down by the river on Front Street in Salem, VA.

Nitro was just 10 weeks old at that time and completely deaf.

Nitro was then taken to the City of Salem Animal Shelter where Christina Lee often take photos of dogs for adoption to list them on Facebook.

That's when a friend of hers showed her Nitro. And it was a match made in heaven.

Nine months after they adopted Nitro, Christina and her husband Chris, decided to launch what is now known as DeafDogsRock.com.

Now, this non-profit organization has made a community where deaf dog families can come and learn about how to train a deaf dog or learn how to live with a deaf dog.

Pet owners can also share their happy deaf dog stories in their Adoptable deaf dogs' section.

Over 4200 deaf dogs have been adopted off their website and over 900+ dogs have been sponsored since 2013 into partner rescues across the U.S. and Canada.

Over the years, Nitro has been an ambassador for deaf dogs all over the world. He's been an inspiration by showing the world that with the proper care, love, and commitment, deaf dogs can still be great pets.

If you'd like to donate to Deaf Dogs Rock, you can press this link here. If you're planning to adopt a deaf dog, you can check out their adoptable dogs here.

Also, Deaf Dogs Rock offers training on how to train deaf dogs.

Contact Information

Email: christina@deafdogsrock.com

Mail: Deaf Dogs Rock
3962 Bluebird Ln
Salem, VA 24153

deaf dogs of oregon

Deaf Dogs of Oregon

Deaf Dogs of Oregon is a group that dedicates its time to rescuing, training, and educating all about deaf dogs all over the United States.

This rescue group rescue and trains deaf dogs from kill shelters all over the country.

Based in Portland, Deaf Dogs of Oregon is a 501c3 nonprofit organization that is devoted to educating the public about deaf dogs.

Their mission is to promote deaf dog education, deaf dog advocacy, safe breeding advocacy, and deaf dog owner support.

All of this was started by Gay Wakeland, a deaf dog advocate, and Chealsea Tuning, who was looking for a support or training group for deaf dogs in Portland.

Turns out, they just live 6 blocks from each other.

They began meeting and concluded that there was a massive lack of support in the deaf dog community.

That's why they've decided to start a deaf dog rescue that will focus on education, advocacy, training, and support for deaf dogs and their respective families.

Over the years, Deaf Dogs of Oregon has helped a lot of deaf dogs and still counting since they started doing adoptions in 2011.

If you're looking to adopt a deaf dog, you can check out their adoptable dogs on their website here.

If you're planning to donate to this rescue group, click this GoFundMe link.

Contact Information

Email: deafdogsoforegon@gmail.com

milo deaf dog foundation

The Milo Foundation

Our next deaf dog group is not specifically a deaf dog rescue. However, the founder's namesake dog, Milo, was deaf and blind.

This creates a soft spot for deaf or blind pups!

Founded in August 1994, The Milo Foundation's mission is to rescue dogs and cats from high-kill animal control shelters and rehome them to loving families that are best suited to provide lifetime care.

They also offer sanctuary for those pets that are not adoptable.

The Milo Foundation also educates the public about how to be a responsible pet owner. This includes spaying or neutering your pet.

Milo is an Australian Shepherd, that was found by Lynne Tingle. They discovered that the puppy was both deaf and blind.

But that didn't stop them from adopting and giving Milo the love that he deserves.

According to Lynne, it was a learning process not just for Milo, but also for her. They generated a series of taps to communicate with Milo.

For instance, a tap on the left or right flank would instruct Milo in which direction to go. On the other hand, a tap on the rear means to stop.

If you would like to see their adoptable dogs, click the link here. But if you're trying to become a foster parent, click this link here.

Contact Information

Mailing Address: PO Box 6625
Albany, CA 94706

Milo Point Richmond Location: 220 S Garrard Blvd
Point Richmond, CA 94801
Map

Contact Number: 510-900-2275

deaf dog groups keller's cause

Keller's Cause

Another great organization where you can adopt deaf dogs is Keller's Cause. Keller's Cause is a 501c3 Non-Profit Organization that rescues the deaf, blind, and double merle dogs.

What is Double Merle you asked? Well, double merle is a dog that inherited two copies of the merle gene.

This gene can be present in many breeds. For instance, it can be found in Australian Shepherds, Collies, Dachshunds, and Chihuahuas.

A double merle happens when two merle-patterned dogs are bred together. After that, each puppy in the litter has a 25% chance of being a double merle.

Double merles are often faced with vision and hearing problems, leading to deafness and blindness.

Fortunately, this can be prevented. How? Through responsible breeding, of course!

Their mission is to teach people about this and prevent dogs from being born blind or deaf.

Founded in September 2015, Keller's Cause has been rescuing dogs that are often dumped or killed.

If you're looking to adopt from this organization, you can check out their adoptable dogs here.

You can also look at the dogs that have been fostered and adopted through Keller's Cause here.

Contact Information

Contact Number: 443-440-6129

Keller's Cause Facebook

Keller's Cause Instagram

deaf dog group speak

Speak! St. Louis

Last on our list is the same as Keller's Cause. Speak! Rescue and Sanctuary is a 501(c)3 non-profit animal rescue specializing in double-merle awareness.

This rescue group is passionate about saving Aussies, Border Collies, and puppies that are born with hearing and vision impairments.

You can check out their available dogs here and you can donate or volunteer here.

Contact Information

You can contact Speak! St. Louis by clicking this link.

They also have a Facebook and Instagram where you can check out all those adorable dogs.

deaf dog pros and cons why it happens

Owning a Deaf Dog

The Pros of Owning a Deaf Dog

  • They have a stronger sense of smell and sight.
  • You can challenge yourself to learn and teach hand signals.
  • They don't have noise aversion.
  • The noise of fireworks and thunder doesn't wake them up.
  • These dogs are excellent cuddlers since they want to feel you near.
  • You don't have to tiptoe around them when they are sleeping.

The Cons of Owning a Deaf Dog

  • Training is different from a normal dog
  • Does not understand verbal cues when in danger
  • If around other pets, especially cats, they will not hear their warnings to stay away when they are unhappy or angry.
  • You can't leave them without a leash in an open area since they can get lost and won't hear your commands.

Causes of Deafness in Dogs

The causes of deafness in dogs can be vastly different. For instance, hearing loss is part of aging in dogs.

According to AKC, about 5-10% of dogs in the United States are deaf. The majority of these cases were born with hearing and then became impaired as an adult.

Moreover, here is a short list of the causes of deafness in dogs:

  • Aging
  • Congenital Hearing Loss
  • Ear Infections
  • Presbycusis
  • Ototoxicity
  • Head Trauma

deaf dog pros and cons

Frequently Asked Questions 

Are white dogs more commonly deaf?

Some congenital deafness is found to be associated with coat colors.

Dogs that carry the piebald gene, a gene that functions to distribute white pigmentation, are often found to be more prone to deafness.

Can a deaf dog live a happy life?

Yes, of course! Deaf dogs are usually adopted by families who are eager to help and rescue shelter animals.

With proper training, care, and huge amounts of love, deaf dogs can live their best lives.

What dog breeds are prone to deafness?

There are plenty of dog breeds that are known to be prone to deafness.

For instance, here's a short list of those dog breeds:

Deaf Dog Groups: Summary

If you're planning to adopt a deaf dog from the deaf dog groups above, I would like to thank you. There are still not enough people who'd adopt these wonderful dogs.

Deaf dogs and any other impaired pets still deserve love and a home where they can live the rest of their lives happily.

The deaf dog rescue above are organizations that can help you find your new best friend.

Remember that regardless of your dog's disability, they are still capable of giving you affection.

Training a deaf dog will not be harder, rather it'll be different. But even if it'll be hard, I'm sure that all of those training will eventually pay off.

It will be a learning journey, not just for your pup, but also for you.

Adopt and save a deaf dog!

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